Students

Learn about the wide range of interprofessional education opportunities available to the health and human service students at UBC.  Find links to information about volunteer opportunities, learning modules, social events, and more.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), interprofessional education (IPE) occurs when “students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes.”[1] Interprofessional education helps ensure students in health and human services programs are prepared to deliver collaborative patient-centered care once they graduate.

Students in the health disciplines have traditionally been trained in professional silos having little interaction with students from other health disciplines. However, in a health care system that is experiencing human resource shortages, escalating costs, and increasingly complex health care needs, health care professionals must work collaboratively to ensure consistent, continuous, and reliable care. IPE helps students develop the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to collaborate effectively.

Students from the same discipline or profession study and master a specific body of knowledge, skills, language and modes of conduct.

Multiprofessional education is defined by the WHO as the process by which a group of students from the health-related occupations with different educational backgrounds learn together during certain periods of their education with interaction as an important goal. Its key objectives are the specific team competencies needed to ensure effective team functioning.

Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Two or more disciplines work or learn together to solve a problem or gather information. For example, medicine, pharmacy and law have to work together if a new drug is being tested for the market available from http://www.cihc.ca/files/CIHC_IPCompetencies_Feb1210.pdf

Interprofessional Collaboration involves “working together with one or more members of the health team who each make a unique contribution to achieving a common goal, enhancing the benet for patients. It is a process for communication and decision making that enables the separate and shared knowledge and skills of different care providers to synergistically influence the care provided through changed attitudes and behaviors all the while emphasizing patient-centered goals and values” (Health Canada, 2010).

Evidence indicates that effective IPC can lead to:

  • Improved patient safety and outcomes
  • Improved use of clinical resources
  • Increased health professional satisfaction
  • Increased access to health care
  • Reduced clinical errors
  • Reduced conflict between health care professionals[3] [4] [5]

 


[1] World Health Organization (WHO). Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education & Collaborative Practice. Health Professions Network Nursing and Midwifery Office within the Department of Human Resources for Health; 2010. Available from: http://www.who.int/hrh/nursing_midwifery/en/.

 [2] World Health Organization (WHO). Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education & Collaborative Practice. Health Professions Network Nursing and Midwifery Office within the Department of Human Resources for Health; 2010. Available from: http://www.who.int/hrh/nursing_midwifery/en/.

[3] Hammick M, Freeth D, Koppel I, Reeves S, Barr H. A best evidence systematic review of interprofessional education: BEME Guide no. 9. Med Teach [Internet]. 2007 Oct [cited 2013 May 16]; 29(8): 735-751. Available from Informa Healthcare: http://tinyurl.com/qapkrvl

 [4] Lemieux-Charles L, McGuire WL. What Do We Know about Health Care Team Effectiveness? A Review of the Literature. Med Care Res Rev [Internet]. 2006 June [cited 2013 May 16]; 63(3): 263-300. Available from Sage Journals Online: http://mcr.sagepub.com/content/63/3/263.abstract

[5] Manser T. Teamwork and patient safety in dynamic domains of healthcare: a review of the literature. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand [Interent]. 2009 Feb [cited 2013 May 16]; 53(2): 143. Available from Medline: http://tinyurl.com/az534up